Recent Changes

Tuesday, March 29

  1. page Prepositions edited Prepositions lead us to the detail oriented portions of a sentence. They want to give more informat…
    Prepositions lead us to the detail oriented portions of a sentence. They want to give more information than just your basic subject and predicate. They seem a little confusing at first, but if you learn a list of prepositions, the phrases are pretty easy to recognize. Here, let Tim and Moby explain it to you!
    ...
    leolaes, password: leolaes)see the board)
    So, you watched the movie. Did you try the quiz? Watch out, number 2 is tricky!
    Here’s a list of prepositions to help you recognize the phrases:
    (view changes)
    9:42 am

Monday, January 27

  1. page home edited Included in this wiki, are glogster posters to help teach grammar concepts. Please feel free to use…
    Included in this wiki, are glogster posters to help teach grammar concepts. Please feel free to use them and make any comments or suggestions you feel will be helpful!
    Career Post Survey
    Career Survey Link
    Grammar Blog
    (view changes)
    8:52 am
  2. page home edited Included in this wiki, are glogster posters to help teach grammar concepts. Please feel free to use…
    Included in this wiki, are glogster posters to help teach grammar concepts. Please feel free to use them and make any comments or suggestions you feel will be helpful!
    Career Survey Link
    Grammar Blog
    (view changes)
    6:14 am

Monday, December 9

  1. page Prepositions edited Prepositions lead us to the detail oriented portions of a sentence. They want to give more informa…
    Prepositions lead us to the detail oriented portions of a sentence. They want to give more information than just your basic subject and predicate. They seem a little confusing at first, but if you learn a list of prepositions, the phrases are pretty easy to recognize. Here, let Tim and Moby explain it to you!
    Brainpop.com – Prepositional Phrases (remember, you might have to log in… user name: leolaes, password: leolaes)
    So, you watched the movie. Did you try the quiz? Watch out, number 2 is tricky!
    Here’s a list of prepositions to help you recognize the phrases:
    about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, as, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, between, beyond, by, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, near, of, off, on, onto, out, outside, over, past, since, through, throughout, to, toward, under, underneath, until, up, upon, with, within, without
    Grammar Rock on YouTube These Grammar Rock videos were on when I was a kid… maybe they will help you learn!
    If you really want some fun, dance along with this!
    Preposition Dance done by 8th Graders Go ahead… really… you can dance if you want to!

    Video Resources:
    Prepositions by The Bazillions
    (view changes)
    9:33 am

Tuesday, December 3

  1. page Verbs edited ... BrainPoP Movies on Verbs Tim and Moby explain Verb Tenses and Subject/Verb Agreement
    ...
    BrainPoP Movies on Verbs
    Tim and Moby explain Verb Tenses
    and
    Subject/Verb Agreement

    (view changes)
    4:52 am
  2. page Verbs edited ... out this Glog. Improvements to come! Glog! Link to Grammar Rock Video on Verbs GAME LINK…
    ...
    out this Glog. Improvements to come!Glog!
    Link to Grammar Rock Video on Verbs
    GAME LINKS:
    ...
    Carnival Lights Helping Verbs, Contractions
    Jeopardy Irregular Verbs
    ...
    Movies on Verbs:
    Verbs
    Tim and Moby explain Verb Tenses

    (view changes)
    4:50 am
  3. page Verbs edited Check out this Glog. Improvements to come! Link to Grammar Rock Video on Verbs GAME LINKS: Verb…
    Check out this Glog. Improvements to come!
    Link to Grammar Rock Video on Verbs
    GAME LINKS:
    Verbs in Space
    Lilly Pad Leap Past-tense verbs
    Carnival Lights Helping Verbs, Contractions
    Jeopardy Irregular Verbs
    BrainPoP Movies on Verbs:

    (view changes)
    4:47 am

Tuesday, November 26

  1. page Subjects and Predicates edited ... Grammar Blast Quia Rags to Riches
    ...
    Grammar Blast
    Quia Rags to Riches

    (view changes)
    5:34 am

Wednesday, July 31

  1. page Independent and Dependent Clauses edited Earlier, we talked about Subjects and Predicates, the parts of a sentence that make it complete. W…
    Earlier, we talked about Subjects and Predicates, the parts of a sentence that make it complete. When we talked about this, we also mentioned sentence fragments and run-on sentences. You might recall that run-on sentences can be fixed rather easily in a few different ways. One way is to think of taking the run-on sentence, and creating an independent and a dependent clause within it.
    Wait a second… what did she just say?
    Okay, let’s try to make this as simple as we can.
    An independent clause is a sentence… that’s it…. Just a sentence that can stand on its own… independent of anything else. Here’s an example:
    My teacher is talking about clauses.
    A dependent clause has to lean on something else. It depends on another part of the sentence to make sense. I’ll show you:
    Because this grammar stuff is complicated, my teacher is talking about clauses.
    Or…
    My teacher is talking about clauses because this grammar stuff is complicated.
    Did you notice the clauses are in bold? Did you also notice where the dependent clause can be placed in a sentence? You did! You are so good at this grammar stuff! That’s right! A dependent clause can go BEFORE the independent clause, or it can go AFTER the independent clause!
    You might be asking yourself by now, “So what? Why should I know this?”
    Here’s the answer: When we use dependent clauses within our sentences, we make our writing more interesting! (Did you see that? Another dependent clause in bold letters!)
    By adding a dependent clause to a sentence, we are able to give more information. (There’s another one!)
    You might have also noticed that I’ve used a comma between the clauses when the dependent clause comes first in the sentence. The comma helps the reader to understand that part of the sentence is extra information… not the main sentence part.
    A sentence does not need a comma when the dependent clause comes after the main sentence. (Not another one!)
    There are some words that signal you a dependent clause is in a sentence. Here is a short list of words to look for:
    because, before, after, although, if, when, whenever, since, while, as, until, unless
    Let’s see if Tim and Moby can help clear this up! (Remember you may need to log into brainpop – user name - leolaes, password - leolaes
    What about a few games to see if we really understand?
    Sentence Speedway lets you identify which sentence parts are dependent or independent clauses.

    (view changes)
    10:48 am

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